Reply to topic  [ 41 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3
collected 
Author Message
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2011 7:13 pm
Posts: 1189
Location: Falkirk, Scotland
Reply with quote
We might have to be a bit wary of sweeping statements such as this from Lew,
"If it had 36 pages of story that's the exception rather than the rule. If you mean 36 pages including ads and covers, that's been the standard format since the 1950s."
Some of the biggest producers of comics in the '50's and '60's, e.g. Dell, had most of the time, 34 pages of comic strip in a 36 page comic. Actually, right up to the mid '60's, Dell had 32 pages of comics in a 36 page issue. Gilbertson's Classics Illustrated ran 52 page comics with 48 pages of comic strip. And the Berkeley editions of the late'80's and '90's were also 52 page editions. Additionally, in the mid '60's, some companies went to giant issues - Tower, 68 pages for 25 cents. also the "split" Cap. Marvel, admittedly a smaller publisher, who had giant issues for 25 cents. But DC for a long period dating from early? '60's produced an awful lot of Giant issues ranging from 100 pages down - great value. As did Marvel, including titles with new material - the origin of Captain Marvel for instance.
ACG in the '6o's had 26 pages of comic strip plus a letters page, usually 2, in a 36 page comic.
Gold Key in the '60's featured 32 pages of comic strip in a 36 page title for 12 cents - no adds, apart from sometimes on the back cover, a bit like Dell.
All the above, apart from the Split publishers were important comic companies and sold piles every month and they didn't conform to the "standard format" and we haven't looked at Charlton yet, who also, I just remembered, went to 52 page issues for a few months in the mid '60's, probably having had a look at the success of Tower.
So there was the 36 page comic and other size issues but the amount of comic strip inside varied a lot, and, it could be argued, some of these titles were much better values than others. Dell, particularly, used some seriously good writers and artists and their production values were quite high.
Excuse my pedantry, please :wink:


Fri Aug 19, 2016 5:44 pm
Profile

Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 12:59 am
Posts: 6931
Reply with quote
paw broon wrote:
We might have to be a bit wary of sweeping statements such as this from Lew,
"If it had 36 pages of story that's the exception rather than the rule. If you mean 36 pages including ads and covers, that's been the standard format since the 1950s."
Some of the biggest producers of comics in the '50's and '60's, e.g. Dell, had most of the time, 34 pages of comic strip in a 36 page comic. Actually, right up to the mid '60's, Dell had 32 pages of comics in a 36 page issue. Gilbertson's Classics Illustrated ran 52 page comics with 48 pages of comic strip. And the Berkeley editions of the late'80's and '90's were also 52 page editions. Additionally, in the mid '60's, some companies went to giant issues - Tower, 68 pages for 25 cents. also the "split" Cap. Marvel, admittedly a smaller publisher, who had giant issues for 25 cents. But DC for a long period dating from early? '60's produced an awful lot of Giant issues ranging from 100 pages down - great value. As did Marvel, including titles with new material - the origin of Captain Marvel for instance.
ACG in the '6o's had 26 pages of comic strip plus a letters page, usually 2, in a 36 page comic.
Gold Key in the '60's featured 32 pages of comic strip in a 36 page title for 12 cents - no adds, apart from sometimes on the back cover, a bit like Dell.
All the above, apart from the Split publishers were important comic companies and sold piles every month and they didn't conform to the "standard format" and we haven't looked at Charlton yet, who also, I just remembered, went to 52 page issues for a few months in the mid '60's, probably having had a look at the success of Tower.
So there was the 36 page comic and other size issues but the amount of comic strip inside varied a lot, and, it could be argued, some of these titles were much better values than others. Dell, particularly, used some seriously good writers and artists and their production values were quite high.
Excuse my pedantry, please :wink:


Please read my comments in their context, "Paw". I was replying to a comment specifically about the format of DC Comics at that point. Their standard format has been 36 pages for the last 60 years. But if you want to include other US publishers too it applies to those also.

Before that, I was responding to a comment pertaining to the story content of comics of 30 years ago, not the 1960s, which has been 20 pages on average.

_________________
The blog of British comics: http://lewstringer.blogspot.com
My website: http://www.lewstringer.com
Blog about my own work: http://lewstringercomics.blogspot.com/


Fri Aug 19, 2016 6:36 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2014 7:10 am
Posts: 578
Location: leicester uk
Reply with quote
For a collector like myself the cover that catches the eye is probably the first consideration and the four covers I have placed at the bottom of the picture are to me excellent examples. Second any comic different from the norm is also of interest and again some examples shown and thirdly the older the comic the more it is of interest to the collector.
All this may be obvious but for those that are interested in the sort of things others are collecting I present this micro shot from my own collection.
The comics now thank you for allowing them to see the daylight before being returned to darkness of the cupboard . :)

Image
Footnote: I use Blend Collage Free app by KDN SOFT to cram many images into the one pic and save space.


Last edited by abacus on Sat Oct 28, 2017 7:35 am, edited 6 times in total.



Fri Oct 27, 2017 12:35 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 11:56 am
Posts: 5032
Reply with quote
The Archie comic is the one that jumps out at me from that selection. I love their covers from that period (though at the time I turned my nose up at them, preferring super heroes).


Attachments:
104963.jpg
104963.jpg [ 76.5 KiB | Viewed 492 times ]
Fri Oct 27, 2017 5:52 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2014 7:10 am
Posts: 578
Location: leicester uk
Reply with quote
Never quite understood the enduring popularity of Archie ,must be a U.S. thing but archie comics produced Sabrina the Teen-age witch for which I have three comics that were printed around the 70s I think ,that's without checking of course and these I find very funny and well suited to the comic format.


Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:10 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 8:20 pm
Posts: 108
Location: Weymouth, Dorset
Reply with quote
abacus wrote:
Never quite understood the enduring popularity of Archie ,must be a U.S. thing but archie comics produced Sabrina the Teen-age witch for which I have three comics that were printed around the 70s I think ,that's without checking of course and these I find very funny and well suited to the comic format.

Interesting, I think for me, it was the feeling in the 70s that I was discovering a snapshot of American culture when at the time, for my 8 or 9 year old self, wasn't so evident in the media. Aside from the stories, I always enjoyed pouring over the adverts for Sea Monkeys, Twinkies and Charles Atlas. Of course, now it is much easier to access all these things. I have been collecting the 'New' Archie COMICS over the last few years and have thourogly enjoyed them - especially the horror titles.

_________________
Scccrrruunnge


Sat Oct 28, 2017 12:16 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2014 7:10 am
Posts: 578
Location: leicester uk
Reply with quote
The comics I read as a child were in a 50's time capsule and for many years after that I'd naturally given up comic reading.In the 50's any new comic that was advertised was eagerly anticipated and nearly all the comics I remember from that period continued successfully for many years.
Since then with a few exceptions it seems to have been difficult to launch new comics to the market and even that stalwart of the U.K. comics D C Thomson has not found it easy.Beezer, Topper and Sparky did OK but some as illustrated struggled.
Maybe they should have called them Beano Extra, Beano Plus or Utterly Beano. :)
Image


Fri Nov 03, 2017 7:08 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2014 7:10 am
Posts: 578
Location: leicester uk
Reply with quote
Things don't change much do they? Though times are hard you are never quite sure about that young fellow sitting outside the bank waiting for handouts, as this cartoon shows from the 1922 Pearson's Weekly magazine.
Image

Although not a comic this magazine has loads of corny jokes that makes it fun reading.


Fri Nov 17, 2017 3:35 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 11:56 am
Posts: 5032
Reply with quote
No doubt an early appearance by the famous Scottish poet Ewan 'What's Twenty Quid to the Bloody Midland Bank' McTeagle! :)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4W9p_NFm6qk


Fri Nov 17, 2017 6:15 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2014 7:10 am
Posts: 578
Location: leicester uk
Reply with quote
philcom55 wrote:
No doubt an early appearance by the famous Scottish poet Ewan 'What's Twenty Quid to the Bloody Midland Bank' McTeagle! :)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4W9p_NFm6qk

That is funny.
Reminds me of the story.

1st chap:"can you give me 5 pound till payday?"
2nd chap:( after reaching for is wallet and giving him a five pound note then asks )"by the way , when is payday?"
1st chap:(with perplexed look)" I don't know, you're the one that's working" :)


Sat Nov 18, 2017 6:57 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 23, 2006 8:43 pm
Posts: 4117
Location: space city
Reply with quote
On the subject of fivers I recommend watching the Abbott and Costello two tens for a five sketch on youtube. I presume everyone here has watched their "who's on first".


Sat Nov 18, 2017 4:59 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 41 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Designed by ST Software.