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Tommy's Troubles 
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Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2014 1:05 am
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Location: Southampton/London
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Adam Eterno wrote:
Phoenix wrote:
Adam Eterno wrote:
Because it's in Greek
Yes, I did actually spot that quite quickly, Adam, but I must confess that I had been hoping for a sensible answer that would draw a clear distinction between two apparently identical letters in Greek that stand for two quite different letters in English. I still am.


I'm sorry Derek, I was in a hurry and trying to help you. My mistake. 'Son' in Greek or any other language, does not necessarily have the letter 's' in it which is the same as most other words and most other languages hence my shortened explanation that it was written in Greek......i.e. a completely different language so you can't use English language assumptions ("that stand for two quite different letters in English") with spellings or grammar etc. For example, son in Spanish is Hijo.

Hopefully you'll understand this explanation and find it more "sensible".

PS, I sent the picture to a Greek friend and asked her the title and she said "Smith and Sons" so the name is translated exactly and could also explain your two letters being the same.


Fri Aug 04, 2017 12:38 pm
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Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2008 9:15 pm
Posts: 4777
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Adam Eterno wrote:
'Son' in Greek or any other language, does not necessarily have the letter 's' in it which is the same as most other words and most other languages hence my shortened explanation that it was written in Greek......i.e. a completely different language so you can't use English language assumptions ("that stand for two quite different letters in English") with spellings or grammar etc. For example, son in Spanish is Hijo.
O.K. Thank you, Adam. Things seem a bit clearer now. I do of course recognise hijo as my degree is in Spanish and Portuguese (filho in that language, the pronunciation of the latter only partly influenced by the French fille, their word for girl or daughter.)


Fri Aug 04, 2017 8:52 pm
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Joined: Tue Jul 04, 2017 12:32 pm
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paw broon wrote:
Had a look at your blog, Nikos. I can't read Greek but it is noticeable the number of Bonelli titles you show and chat about. Mind you, the giveaway is calling it "blekmagazine". There are also some well known French characters in there. I've been a fan of Mr. No for a long time and bought the original Italian comics when on holiday. Well done.


Thanks a lot for your visit and interest about my work. I wish you all the best!!! :D :) :)


Mon Aug 07, 2017 5:51 am
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Joined: Tue Jul 04, 2017 12:32 pm
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Phoenix wrote:
philcom55 wrote:
The title translates as 'The Rowdy with Number 6'
I'm pretty sure that this will be the text serial The Fiery Man At Number 6, which appeared in The Rover in 1972. Fuller identification details later (i.e. tomorrow morning) if required. The footballer in question was called Joe Greer. OK, before I go to bed then, according to my notes the picture version of The Fiery Man At Number 6 was in The Wizard in 1971 (starting in 56), and The Victor in 1978 (starting in 905).


Many thanks for your great help!!!!! I wish you all the best, Nikos. :D :) :)


Mon Aug 07, 2017 5:53 am
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Joined: Tue Jul 04, 2017 12:32 pm
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Phoenix wrote:
philcom55 wrote:
...And here's the Greek version of 'Smith and Son
Assuming that the Greek title is saying Smith And Son, how is it that the initial letter of 'Smith' is exactly the same as the last letter of 'Son'?


The explanation is that all male contest (names, objects e.t.c.) words in Greek language finish with an 'S' ('Σ' in Greek) 'ΓΙΟΣ' = 'Son' :D :D :D


Mon Aug 07, 2017 6:02 am
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Joined: Tue Jul 04, 2017 12:32 pm
Posts: 44
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Adam Eterno wrote:
Phoenix wrote:
Adam Eterno wrote:
Because it's in Greek
Yes, I did actually spot that quite quickly, Adam, but I must confess that I had been hoping for a sensible answer that would draw a clear distinction between two apparently identical letters in Greek that stand for two quite different letters in English. I still am.


I'm sorry Derek, I was in a hurry and trying to help you. My mistake. 'Son' in Greek or any other language, does not necessarily have the letter 's' in it which is the same as most other words and most other languages hence my shortened explanation that it was written in Greek......i.e. a completely different language so you can't use English language assumptions ("that stand for two quite different letters in English") with spellings or grammar etc. For example, son in Spanish is Hijo.

Hopefully you'll understand this explanation and find it more "sensible".

PS, I sent the picture to a Greek friend and asked her the title and she said "Smith and Son" so the name is translated exactly.


Exactly !!! :D :D :D


Mon Aug 07, 2017 6:05 am
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