Comic Strip Cards

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philcom55
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Re: Comic Strip Cards

Post by philcom55 »

grumpy old man wrote:I also remember the American Civil War cards one that stuck in the mind (excuse the pun!) was of a soldier being pushed into a pit of spikes.
Oh yes! Somehow I missed the Mars Attacks series the first time around but I can definitely remember those. Didn't they include Confederate banknotes in the packet as well?

- Phil Rushton

Cap Haggis
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Comic Strip Cards

Post by Cap Haggis »

Oh that rings a bell as well "Philcom55" - I'm pretty sure confederate notes were included in the Civil War cards - also remember the soldier onthe pike illustration.
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Lew Stringer
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Re: Comic Strip Cards

Post by Lew Stringer »

Cap Haggis wrote:Oh that rings a bell as well "Philcom55" - I'm pretty sure confederate notes were included in the Civil War cards - also remember the soldier onthe pike illustration.
That's right. Unfortunately although most of us kept the cards we threw away the notes, and I think they're more valuable now as a result.

By the way; I've uploaded that "pike" illustration (amongst others) on the previous page.

Lew
The blog of British comics: http://lewstringer.blogspot.com
My website: http://www.lewstringer.com
Blog about my own work: http://lewstringercomics.blogspot.com/

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stevezodiac
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Comic Strip Cards

Post by stevezodiac »

I kept the confederate dollars, have about a hundred of them. It's the wrappers that are the hardest to find and, consequently, the most valuable. I was quite lucky because i lost all the cards in the 60s but my newsagent must have found a spare box he'd forgotten about and put them on sale in the early seventies and i managed to acquire almost a whole set with the notes. Then picked up another bundle of the cards at the same flea market i got the Jack Davis cards from. Paid about two quid for them and felt slightly guilty.

Lew Stringer
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Re: Comic Strip Cards

Post by Lew Stringer »

stevezodiac wrote:I kept the confederate dollars, have about a hundred of them. It's the wrappers that are the hardest to find and, consequently, the most valuable. I was quite lucky because i lost all the cards in the 60s but my newsagent must have found a spare box he'd forgotten about and put them on sale in the early seventies and i managed to acquire almost a whole set with the notes. Then picked up another bundle of the cards at the same flea market i got the Jack Davis cards from. Paid about two quid for them and felt slightly guilty.
That's brilliant! What a find.

Although it's amusing that your newsagent had no hesitation in selling bubble gum that was six years old. No "best before" dates on products then of course. :wink:

Lew
The blog of British comics: http://lewstringer.blogspot.com
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Blog about my own work: http://lewstringercomics.blogspot.com/

Kashgar
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Comic Strip Cards

Post by Kashgar »

Thanks for putting up those examples of 'comic book foldees' Lew. Despite the fact that they looked about as old as the Dead Sea Scrolls they brought back a load of memories. Thank God I didn't remember their name though, supposing that I ever knew it, what a bloody awful word 'foldee' is. Still its hardly a word that is going to come up in general conversation too often, even amongst comic collectors, unlike the phrase 'graphic novel' which I find pretty irritating or that, let's invent a really teeth-grinding word for a comic collector, ie a panelologist, when the two we have are already more than adequate.
All this talk of words brings to mind an edition of 'Call My Bluff' some years ago, it may have even been in the days of the inimitable Robert Robinson, when one of the words to be identified was a word common to comic collectors but apparently not so to the general public 'fanzine' and, if memory serves, I think the guessing team got it wrong.

Lew Stringer
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Re: Comic Strip Cards

Post by Lew Stringer »

Kashgar wrote: All this talk of words brings to mind an edition of 'Call My Bluff' some years ago, it may have even been in the days of the inimitable Robert Robinson, when one of the words to be identified was a word common to comic collectors but apparently not so to the general public 'fanzine' and, if memory serves, I think the guessing team got it wrong.

I've met a number of comic fans who pronounce it fan-zyne (rhymes with sign) so I don't think they knew the origin of the word either. :wink:

As for the terms "graphic novel" and "panelologist" : often used by fans who are embarrassed for "adult" comics to be associated with humour comics, in my experience. People who also use phrases like "There's more to comics than The Beano" and "Ew! Too cartoony!". :wink:

(This seems to be particular to American and British comic culture. In most countries adventure and humour comics seem to be treated as equals.)

Lew
The blog of British comics: http://lewstringer.blogspot.com
My website: http://www.lewstringer.com
Blog about my own work: http://lewstringercomics.blogspot.com/

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stevezodiac
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Re: Comic Strip Cards

Post by stevezodiac »

Lew Stringer wrote:
stevezodiac wrote:I kept the confederate dollars, have about a hundred of them. It's the wrappers that are the hardest to find and, consequently, the most valuable. I was quite lucky because i lost all the cards in the 60s but my newsagent must have found a spare box he'd forgotten about and put them on sale in the early seventies and i managed to acquire almost a whole set with the notes. Then picked up another bundle of the cards at the same flea market i got the Jack Davis cards from. Paid about two quid for them and felt slightly guilty.
That's brilliant! What a find.

Although it's amusing that your newsagent had no hesitation in selling bubble gum that was six years old. No "best before" dates on products then of course. :wink:

Lew
The bubble gum, those pink squares of it, was very brittle but once you started chewing it it became normal but i have never been into bubble/cheqing gum. I could be wrong with the dates of course. You know how when you're a kid years seem to last forever but it was a long gap and well after the original cards were history.

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Re: Comic Strip Cards

Post by Lew Stringer »

Cap Haggis wrote:Oh that rings a bell as well "Philcom55" - I'm pretty sure confederate notes were included in the Civil War cards - also remember the soldier onthe pike illustration.
Just found this website which shows all of those Civil War cards in full gory detail!

http://www.normansaunders.com/CvlWar%2C01.html

One forgets how liberal things were when those cards came out in the mid-sixties. There's no way newsagents would sell such things to young kids today. (Although I would argue that showing how bloody and horrific warfare can be is a positive thing to teach kids.)

In fact even The Steel Claw shoving his fingers into light sockets wouldn't be allowed in a children's comic now. Yet did it affect us as kids? No.

If people are wondering why UK adventure comics practically died out then one reason is that publishers became nervous of public reaction after Action was banned and subsequent launches such as Speed and Buddy had no edge to them. But that's a topic for another thread.

Lew
The blog of British comics: http://lewstringer.blogspot.com
My website: http://www.lewstringer.com
Blog about my own work: http://lewstringercomics.blogspot.com/

Cap Haggis
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Comic Strip Cards

Post by Cap Haggis »

Excellent link Lew, thanks again so great memories there (well not the gore - you know what I mean )
Cap Haggis to the rescue of all deep fried foods

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philcom55
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Comic Strip Cards

Post by philcom55 »

Anybody remember this series advertised in a 1967 issue of Tiger & Hurricane? At the time I was quite frustrated by the fact that they were only available from Wall's vans - and we lived in a Mr Whippy zone! On the other hand I recall being a bit disappointed by the few cards I did acquire since the Dr. Who depicted in them looked almost nothing like Patrick Troughton (presumably the artist responsible was John Canning who had the same problem with the TV Comic version).

[IMG:294:800]http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q123 ... SkyRay.jpg[/img]

All in all I reckon it must count as one of the rarest Dr. Who 'strips' ever; fortunately, thanks to the magic of the internet, I've discovered it can now be viewed by any Tom, Dick or Harry at:

http://www.cuttingsarchive.org.uk/misce ... /front.htm

- Phil Rushton

Lew Stringer
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Re: Comic Strip Cards

Post by Lew Stringer »

Thanks for that Phil. I always wondered what that book was like! (I tried to find that ad for my blog on adverts the other week but couldn't find it at the time.)

The Doctor there looks more like David Tennant than Troughton. Maybe Canning had a crystal ball.

Lew
The blog of British comics: http://lewstringer.blogspot.com
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stevezodiac
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Comic Strip Cards

Post by stevezodiac »

I got the Walls Sky Ray booklet when it came out and still have it somewhere. Can't remember if i stuck any cards in it though. I was born in 1956 and started collecting comics in 1965 which, in hindsight, was probably the best time to start. Some might argue that the 30s and 40s were the golden age but I think the 60s produced some really inovative and exciting titles. TV21 with its 100 years ahead dates for example. In the 30s comics were pretty much all similar. (Apart from, of course, Happy Days of which I am still to procure a single copy). Perhaps the next Indiana Jones flick could be called Indiana Jones and the first edition of Happy Days. JONES: "I've got the Turin Shroud, the cross Christ was nailed to, Hitlers pot of half finished Brylcreem, Napoleon's long john's, one of Nessie's toenails, a pair of half used spectacles as worn by Admiral Nelson and a fig leaf from the wardobe of Adam" ME: "And Happy Days number one?" JONES: "What are you, some kind of a nut?"

Lew Stringer
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Re: Comic Strip Cards

Post by Lew Stringer »

stevezodiac wrote:(Apart from, of course, Happy Days of which I am still to procure a single copy).
I've never seen one either, except for the cover reproductions in books on comics. Copies of Chips, Comic Cuts etc turn up, but not Happy Days. Does anyone here have a copy?

Lew
The blog of British comics: http://lewstringer.blogspot.com
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stevezodiac
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Comic Strip Cards

Post by stevezodiac »

Actually a dealer had some a few years ago at the comic mart in Bloomsbury but I turned my nose up at them because he wanted about 15 quid a copy. Now realise that was a bargain. Lew I have scanned some of those Jack Davis black humour valentine cards is there any way I can send them to you if you are interested in a peek? Haven't figured out to put images on this forum.

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