British comics in America

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Digifiend
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Re: British comics in America

Post by Digifiend » 28 Sep 2012, 02:04

Yes, anime is cartoons. Most of the superheroes get adapted as cartoons, and that's how they're best known in the west. The best known example is probably Sailor Moon.

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Re: British comics in America

Post by Marionette » 28 Sep 2012, 17:24

Digifiend wrote:Yes, anime is cartoons. Most of the superheroes get adapted as cartoons, and that's how they're best known in the west. The best known example is probably Sailor Moon.
Even though the American translation (if you can even call it that) of Sailor Moon was terrible. And twenty years ago.
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Re: British comics in America

Post by Digifiend » 28 Sep 2012, 18:35

They also never bothered finishing it. There's a remake due soon, hopefully it'll get better treatment.

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Re: British comics in America

Post by Marionette » 29 Sep 2012, 22:32

There was actually a subtitled DVD set of all 200 episodes released by ADV. For reasons possibly associated with them going bust shortly afterwards the discs are very scarce.
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Re: British comics in America

Post by felneymike » 05 Oct 2012, 08:39

Anime is animation, it's a word borrowed from French (the Japanese for trousers is Zubon, which comes from the French Jupon). Manga literally means "random sketches", and the first title to be called "Manga" really was just random sketches, though now it's come to mean comics.

There are various superhero stories in Japan, if you look at Bakuman (which is about some kids trying to make it big as comic artists) one of their rivals draws a superhero story called Crow. A lot of the superhero stories over there, though, take place in a completely fantasy world, rather than having a caped crusader saving people from falling off buildings in the real world (though no doubt there's some of that too). There's also plenty of stories about people with super powers fighting monsters and each other, which come under the vague umbrella of "Shonen battle". They're all basically the same, they tap into the Japanese culture of gradual self-improvement, which probably comes from the fact they have to learn 2000 Chinese characters as they go through school, in 'batches' each year.

There is one, which I hope will be translated into English, called Billy Bat. The first book has several short, colour, superhero stories about a batman-type hero (though more cartoonish). But after the colour pages end it's revealed the story is actually about the artist of Billy Bat, a Japanese immigrant trying to get by in late 40's America.

ANYWAY, I also have an issue of Bunty from the 90's where some Canadian girls have sent a letter saying they love Bunty but "have nothing like it over here".

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Re: British comics in America

Post by Shaqui » 16 Oct 2012, 07:03

paw broon wrote:Harvey comics published lots of non-superhero titles with Richie Rich; Casper;Little Dot; the aforementioned Little Lotta etc. but these were cartoony comics as opposed to British girls comics.
Charlton produced a lot of different genres too. A potted history is included in the introduction to my Space:1999 magazines feature:

http://www.technodelic.pwp.blueyonder.c ... 99US01.htm

:D

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